Lurgy

Lurgy
Li-er-gh-ee. A mysterious and deep rooted illness generally affecting breathing, but given to any fictional disease that persists for more then a few days.

I called in to work sick today, told them I had the lurgy.


Dictionary of american slang with examples. .

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Look at other dictionaries:

  • Lurgy — If you have the lurgy it means you are ill, you have the Flu. Don t go near people with the lurgy in case you get it! …   The American's guide to speaking British

  • Lurgy — Li er gh ee. A mysterious and deep rooted illness generally affecting breathing, but given to any fictional disease that persists for more then a few days. I called in to work sick today, told them I had the lurgy …   Dictionary of american slang

  • lurgy — noun (singular) BrE humorous an illness, especially one that is infectious but not serious: Anne s got the dreaded lurgy …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • lurgy — Noun. Any unspecified or indeterminate illness. Jocular use. Also lurgee and lurgi. See dreaded lurgy . Informal …   English slang and colloquialisms

  • lurgy — /ˈlɜgi/ (say lergee) noun Colloquial (humorous) 1. an imaginary disease thought of as being highly infectious. 2. any illness. Also, lurgi, the dreaded lurgy, the dreaded lurgi. {coined by British comedian Spike Milligan, 1919–2002} …  

  • Lurgy — …   Wikipedia

  • Lurgy — 1. fictitious, very infectious disease; 2. any illness (coined by the Radio Goons) …   Dictionary of Australian slang

  • lurgy — Australian Slang 1. fictitious, very infectious disease; 2. any illness (coined by the Radio Goons) …   English dialects glossary

  • lurgy — lur|gy [ lɜrgi ] noun singular BRITISH HUMOROUS any minor illness or disease …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • lurgy — [ lə:gi] noun (plural lurgies) Brit. humorous an unspecified illness. Origin 1950s: of unknown origin; freq. used in the British radio series The Goon Show, of the 1950s and 1960s …   English new terms dictionary

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